Sunday, June 4, 2017

Ignoring sloppiness: a sign of tolerance or mismanagement?


To one reader who may have been wondering – I have been out of the country, and I’d say, out of a social life, and spent some time with my close family.
I am back and I started teaching my summer classes. During my years of teaching I have developed a certain routine. Since I arrive very early, my first trip is to the office kitchen, where I charge the coffee machine to make my first mug, which would keep me for a couple of hours. This time, however, my routine had been broken. Since recent time, the office people keep the machine working only between 9 am and 5 pm. When the office is closed, the kitchen is still available, but the coffee machine is off. Turned out, one night a janitor saw a smoke coming out from under the kitchen door.  Evidently, some grad student, or a postdoc, left the machine on, with an almost empty jar sitting on the heater. Naturally, the facilities classified this incident as a fire hazard, and as the result – the first time in a decade – I was not able to use the office coffee machine in the morning.
That made me to bring my own personal small coffee maker. It also made me think. I realized that for the last several years our office kitchen has been encountering more and more issues. Lately, almost once a month we had circulated an email asking everyone to keep the kitchen clean.
This is the beginning of one of such long letter:
“Dear all, Unfortunately, I need to be reaching out to our community about kitchen etiquette.”
An excerpt from another one: 
“Hi All, I wanted to address an issue that we have been having with the break room coffee machine. If the coffee machine is in the process of brewing, DO NOT remove the pot to pour a glass. No matter how quick you swap out the pots, some coffee is spilled onto the burner and damages the machine. A couple weeks ago the machine had to be replaced because the burners were no longer functioning, which was caused by coffee being spilled and left to burn on the hot plate”. 
Several years ago, I would read similar emails maybe once a year. Nowadays, I see fairly regularly spilled coffee, stains from food, dripping socket, leftovers from cutting paper (see the above picture), empty boxes from fast food, etc. Or look at the pile of graded lab reports just left on a floor, despite the fact that 5 feet away there is a recycling bin.
Some of my teaching fellows cannot manage to remember when they should do their office hours. But more importantly, they do not think it is a big deal.
One might think that I am whining about “the youth”. That would be a wrong impression. “The youth” (grad students, even postdocs) do exactly what they are supposed to do – being absent minded. They are too old to have a babysitter who would be reminding them what to do and when. But they are too young to have a personal assistant who would be reminding them what to do and when. They are at that age when they need to learn from other professionals, first of all from the people managing their professional actions, what does it mean to be a professional.
Every institution, every social organization should have people designated specifically to teaching “the youth” what does it mean to be a professional, i.e. to teach the basics of the professional ethics (etiquette).

If newly hired employees misbehave, the main reason for that is - the management allows it, the management does not spend enough time for… and does not see the necessity in… teaching to the “youth” the structure of the professional behavior. The result is – a slow, graduate, almost invisible rise in the overall sloppiness.
If you start thinking about it, you will remember things which were not acceptable in the past, but have become normal these days. It happens everywhere, in stores, at hospitals. You cannot believe what is happening behind closed doors in nursing homes (and don't make me start talking about potholes!). And one more thing; for the last five years I have not attended a single big meeting that would start on time.
I am absolutely convinced that the rise in the sloppiness at all social and governmental levels was one of the factors which helped Donald Trump to win.
People do not like sloppiness.
Or, rather, people do not like when somebody else's sloppiness negatively affects their everyday functioning. But people do not want to confront those managers who tolerate the sloppiness (people in general try to avoid any “confrontation”, even if it is a discussion about how to make things to work better). Instead, they turn to a “strong leader”, who is (a) an outsider (i.e. does not belong to the current managers hated by people), and (b) promises to solve all the problems at once.
A week ago I would not let myself to publish this piece. I know that many readers would find it (for whatever reasons, some of which mentioned here http://gomars.xyz/op.html#stag) “offensive”, or “patronizing”. But in his latest “The New Rules” segment Bill Maher expressed a very similar sentiment (http://deadline.com/2017/05/bill-maher-hbo-real-time-superheroes-new-rules-1202098782/). He described Donald Trump as a Super Hero called upon by people to solve all the existing problems. 

So, all I did in this piece is - I just added some personal perspective on the matter.
One might ask, why do I care so much?
Well.
Before I moved to the U.S. from Russia I held some managerial positions (http://www.GoMars.xyz/vv.htm). For example, I ran an IT department at a state teachers’ school; I ran a small but important institution (a research arm of a city department of education). I also used to work as a managing consultant for schools and school districts. So, I know a thing or two about management (my theory is that overtime more and more managers adopted "a reactive management style", and less and less managers use "a proactive management style"; instead of thinking ahead, anticipating what might happen and organizing - a.k.a. managing - people accordingly, they just wait until something happens and react; "don't fix it if it ain't broke" type of "management").
But when I moved to the U.S. I knew I would not be managing anymore. I have found a good and comfortable job, and just ignored all the sloppiness and all the signs of mismanagement around me. 
I had one simple reason for ignoring those things – they did NOT have any effect on my life.
Until November 9, 2016.
For me, November 9th, 2016 was the result of (a) a "half" of a country was not thinking and voted for Trump (more on the role of "thinking" is here https://teachologyforall.blogspot.com/2017/04/cyber.html); (b) another "half" of a country was not smart enough to prevent Trump from winning (starting from pushing for the worst Democratic candidate: https://teachologyforall.blogspot.com/2017/04/clinton.html).
Trump’s presidency had shown me that I should not have been ignoring the sloppiness around me. No one should have been ignoring the sloppiness around them. Maybe, just maybe, we would have had a different president. With the Trump at the helm all my hopes for a simple and quiet retirement are at risk. I am not old yet, but I want to know that when I will, I will be able to afford my medical bills – at the minimum. So, my current strategy is borrowed from The Department of The Homeland Security: “see something – say something”.


This is me saying what I see.